Words & Deeds

New public market coming to Boise will be the first of its kind here

A rendering of the new public marketplace coming to the Boise Spectrum.
A rendering of the new public marketplace coming to the Boise Spectrum.

Imagine walking into Boise’s new public marketplace, ordering a glass of wine, grabbing a bite from a local restaurant, then browsing Idaho vendors for cheeses or sweets.

It’s coming at a new dining and beverage-sipping destination at the Boise Spectrum in West Boise.

The still unnamed public market is scheduled to open in spring 2018 at 7609 W. Overland Road. It’s on the east side of Guang Zhou Chinese restaurant, across from Edwards 21 Cinemas.

The public market will be the first of its kind in Boise, says Matthew Schirmer, leasing manager for D.D. Dunlap Companies, which owns the Spectrum. The idea is to dine, drink and unwind.

“This has been in the works for probably six years,” Schirmer says. “It’s very popular in the larger coastal cities.”

Boise’s public market won’t be as high end as, say, The Oxbow Public Market in Napa, California. Or as large as The Ferry Building in San Francisco. Four vacant Spectrum spaces recently were converted into one large suite — just over 7,200 square feet.

Dede Schwab, marketing director for D. D. Dunlap, says this will be intimate and tailored to Boise.

“You’re kind of walking into somebody’s living room,” she says, “with lots of different food choices and a place to hang out. Something for everyone.”

The bar will be in the middle, surrounded by roughly five to six individually built-out restaurant spaces around the perimeter. In addition to the restaurants, vendors will sell food.

“Our goal is to have some sort of cheese vendor,” Schirmer says. “So you’re looking at like a charcuterie board — really good, high-end cheeses. Grab-and go-stuff. Or stuff that you can open up right there and eat right in the space with your glass of wine.”

Some retailers will offer non-food items, he says, and strive to be unique to Boise. Customers might be able to find homemade soaps, olive oils, fresh flowers or locally made jewelry.

“There’s a whole number of different things that will be retailed in that space,” Schirmer says.

Three to four permanent retailers are planned, he says. Pop-up vendors might appear on weekends or during holiday season.

Schwab says the public market’s decor will capture Boise’s outdoor feel. There will be communal tables, up-to-the-counter seating and roll-up doors that lead to a patio.

“We’re excited,” she says. “This is going to be a great community gathering place. Just a place that’s got a cool vibe.”

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