ArtsBeat

New York Times features Boise-area refugee photos

Angie Smith’s “Stronger Shines the Light Inside” of Boise refugees are on exhibit on Downtown Boise streets through Nov. 1. They’re also featured in a photo essay in the New York Times Sunday Magazine. The publications education edition will feature Smith’s essay on Boise refugee graduation seniors. Abdullah Salman, 18, in the left image, at Borah High School’s graduation ceremony is featured in the essay.
Angie Smith’s “Stronger Shines the Light Inside” of Boise refugees are on exhibit on Downtown Boise streets through Nov. 1. They’re also featured in a photo essay in the New York Times Sunday Magazine. The publications education edition will feature Smith’s essay on Boise refugee graduation seniors. Abdullah Salman, 18, in the left image, at Borah High School’s graduation ceremony is featured in the essay. Idaho Statesman file

Last week, photojournalist Angie Smith saw her photographs of Boise refugees reproduced larger-than-life on banners that run along Downtown Boise streets.

Now, some of her work for “Stronger Shines the Light Inside,” a photo collection that illuminates the lives of refugees living in the U.S. starting with Boise, is featured in the New York Times Sunday Magazine.

You can see “The New High School Outsiders” online now and in Sunday’s print edition.

Smith, 35, now lives in Los Angeles. She grew up in Eugene, Oregon, and spent summers and some time each winter in Boise with family and developed a strong attachment to the community. She has been living in Boise for the past year to work on this project that encompasses refugees of all ages.

A freelance photographer, Smith does regular assignments for the Times Magazine. She pitched this idea when she started the larger body of work.

“They wanted to do their own spin on the project, so we decided to do a story on graduating seniors for the magazine’s education issue,” Smith says.

The magazine features her eloquent photographs of teenage refugees who navigate a particularly challenging social terrain in Boise-area high schools, as they figure out their lives in their new home.

Smith will head back to L.A. to pursue the rest of her project. But first she is invited to go to Washington, D.C., for a national reception for organizations working on refugee resettlement.

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