This July 10, 1945, photo from th U.S. Navy shows the USS Indianapolis (CA 35) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, after her final overhaul and repair of combat damage. Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945.
This July 10, 1945, photo from th U.S. Navy shows the USS Indianapolis (CA 35) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, after her final overhaul and repair of combat damage. Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945. AP
This July 10, 1945, photo from th U.S. Navy shows the USS Indianapolis (CA 35) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, in Northern California, after her final overhaul and repair of combat damage. Civilian researchers say they have located the wreck of the USS Indianapolis, the World War II heavy cruiser that played a critical role in the atomic bombing of Hiroshima before being struck by Japanese torpedoes. The Indianapolis, with 1,196 sailors and Marines on board, was sailing the Philippine Sea between Guam and Leyte Gulf when two torpedoes from a Japanese submarine struck just after midnight on July 30, 1945. AP

Forgotten heroes: USS Indianapolis discovery offers chance to recall crew’s WWII courage

August 23, 2017 08:57 AM