Judge Natalie E. Hudson listens to oral arguments from attorneys at a hearing in St. Paul, Minn. Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008. The hearing, before a three-judge panel of the Minnesota Court of Appeals, was to determine whether Idaho Sen. Larry Craig should be allowed to withdraw the misdemeanor disorderly conduct guilty plea he quietly entered last year following an arrest during a flight layover at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Craig, who did not attend the hearing, pleaded guilty following his arrest in an airport men's room sex sting. (AP Photo/ Jean Pieri,Pool)
Judge Natalie E. Hudson listens to oral arguments from attorneys at a hearing in St. Paul, Minn. Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008. The hearing, before a three-judge panel of the Minnesota Court of Appeals, was to determine whether Idaho Sen. Larry Craig should be allowed to withdraw the misdemeanor disorderly conduct guilty plea he quietly entered last year following an arrest during a flight layover at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Craig, who did not attend the hearing, pleaded guilty following his arrest in an airport men's room sex sting. (AP Photo/ Jean Pieri,Pool) AP
Judge Natalie E. Hudson listens to oral arguments from attorneys at a hearing in St. Paul, Minn. Wednesday, Sept. 10, 2008. The hearing, before a three-judge panel of the Minnesota Court of Appeals, was to determine whether Idaho Sen. Larry Craig should be allowed to withdraw the misdemeanor disorderly conduct guilty plea he quietly entered last year following an arrest during a flight layover at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport. Craig, who did not attend the hearing, pleaded guilty following his arrest in an airport men's room sex sting. (AP Photo/ Jean Pieri,Pool) AP

Minnesota court hears Larry Craig's appeal

September 11, 2008 12:00 AM

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