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There are other ways to change Obamacare. What would cuts mean to Idaho?

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UPDATED July 21, 2017 07:58 PM

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  • 'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

    Lourdes Matsumoto says she was subjected to a variety of sexual and racial harassment and other concerning behavior by a supervisor at the Idaho State Controller's Office. Dec. 8, 2017, a day after announcing her claim against the state was settled, she spoke about the bigger picture of sexual harassment across the country and about the #metoo movement. "I think it's really important that employers do the right thing, and they take employee reports seriously and do honest investigations and really look at what's in the best interests of protecting their employees when it comes to harassment and discrimination."