Ginger Katz and her husband, Larry Katz, who lost their son Ian to a heroin overdose in 1996, and started a foundation to try to end the silence surrounding addiction, in Burlington, Mass., Sept. 18, 2015. The growing army of families of those lost to heroin are now using their influence, anger and grief to cushion the country’s approach to drugs, and prodding government to treat it not as a crime, but as a disease.
Ginger Katz and her husband, Larry Katz, who lost their son Ian to a heroin overdose in 1996, and started a foundation to try to end the silence surrounding addiction, in Burlington, Mass., Sept. 18, 2015. The growing army of families of those lost to heroin are now using their influence, anger and grief to cushion the country’s approach to drugs, and prodding government to treat it not as a crime, but as a disease. KATHERINE TAYLOR The New York Times
Ginger Katz and her husband, Larry Katz, who lost their son Ian to a heroin overdose in 1996, and started a foundation to try to end the silence surrounding addiction, in Burlington, Mass., Sept. 18, 2015. The growing army of families of those lost to heroin are now using their influence, anger and grief to cushion the country’s approach to drugs, and prodding government to treat it not as a crime, but as a disease. KATHERINE TAYLOR The New York Times

Nation & World

As heroin use by whites soars, parents urge gentler drug war

October 30, 2015 7:19 PM

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