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A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting 1:47

A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting

18 months after Idaho's Pioneer Fire, less than 10 percent of forest being salvage logged 1:03

18 months after Idaho's Pioneer Fire, less than 10 percent of forest being salvage logged

'Super' fish? Salmon may surprise you. But they're in peril, and need our help. 2:28

'Super' fish? Salmon may surprise you. But they're in peril, and need our help.

These are the voices speaking for wild salmon, Northwest dams & nearby communities 2:56

These are the voices speaking for wild salmon, Northwest dams & nearby communities

Free the Snake flotilla seeks to save wild salmon 1:29

Free the Snake flotilla seeks to save wild salmon

Here's how the Eagle Fish Hatchery handles Idaho's famous salmon 1:30

Here's how the Eagle Fish Hatchery handles Idaho's famous salmon

Watch the sun disappear into smoke over Boise in this time-lapse video 0:28

Watch the sun disappear into smoke over Boise in this time-lapse video

'We've been managing salmon wrong for about 125 years' 2:27

'We've been managing salmon wrong for about 125 years'

Northwest fish hatcheries: 'A very valuable use of the public trust' 2:31

Northwest fish hatcheries: 'A very valuable use of the public trust'

Tour an Idaho fish hatchery 2:58

Tour an Idaho fish hatchery

One of the California condors you can see on display at the World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise, started life as an egg laid by the last two wild condors in the world, before his parents were captured to become part of a captive breeding program to save the species. He's played a role in the growth of the condor population, and he's got a new one soon. His name is Nojoqui, pronounced "Nahoy." Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com
One of the California condors you can see on display at the World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise, started life as an egg laid by the last two wild condors in the world, before his parents were captured to become part of a captive breeding program to save the species. He's played a role in the growth of the condor population, and he's got a new one soon. His name is Nojoqui, pronounced "Nahoy." Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com

‘Condor mom’ biologist raised chick No. 628 to fly free. Lead killed it. So why is she proud?

October 21, 2017 12:59 PM

More Videos

A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting 1:47

A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting

18 months after Idaho's Pioneer Fire, less than 10 percent of forest being salvage logged 1:03

18 months after Idaho's Pioneer Fire, less than 10 percent of forest being salvage logged

'Super' fish? Salmon may surprise you. But they're in peril, and need our help. 2:28

'Super' fish? Salmon may surprise you. But they're in peril, and need our help.

These are the voices speaking for wild salmon, Northwest dams & nearby communities 2:56

These are the voices speaking for wild salmon, Northwest dams & nearby communities

Free the Snake flotilla seeks to save wild salmon 1:29

Free the Snake flotilla seeks to save wild salmon

Here's how the Eagle Fish Hatchery handles Idaho's famous salmon 1:30

Here's how the Eagle Fish Hatchery handles Idaho's famous salmon

Watch the sun disappear into smoke over Boise in this time-lapse video 0:28

Watch the sun disappear into smoke over Boise in this time-lapse video

'We've been managing salmon wrong for about 125 years' 2:27

'We've been managing salmon wrong for about 125 years'

Northwest fish hatcheries: 'A very valuable use of the public trust' 2:31

Northwest fish hatcheries: 'A very valuable use of the public trust'

Tour an Idaho fish hatchery 2:58

Tour an Idaho fish hatchery