These combined images show, at left, a healthy pteropod collected by NOAA and Oregon State University scientists, and at right, one that shows signs of damage from ocean acidification. The white lines on the grooves of the shell at right show areas where it is beginning to dissolve. The pock marks and white spots are signs of severe dissolution.
These combined images show, at left, a healthy pteropod collected by NOAA and Oregon State University scientists, and at right, one that shows signs of damage from ocean acidification. The white lines on the grooves of the shell at right show areas where it is beginning to dissolve. The pock marks and white spots are signs of severe dissolution. Provided by NOAA
These combined images show, at left, a healthy pteropod collected by NOAA and Oregon State University scientists, and at right, one that shows signs of damage from ocean acidification. The white lines on the grooves of the shell at right show areas where it is beginning to dissolve. The pock marks and white spots are signs of severe dissolution. Provided by NOAA

Acidic oceans and warm rivers that kill Idaho’s salmon might be norm in 50 years

More from the series

20 years later, Idaho's salmon are still in danger of disappearing forever

The salmon of the Northwest are the stuff of legends. Pioneers talked of rivers so thick that they were tempted to cross on the backs of the fish. But times have changed, the fish's numbers have plunged, and 13 species were placed on the endangered species list by 1995. Climate change and our network of hydropower dams have helped thwart attempts so far to find a sustainable solution. And it's possible some of our strategies - including our reliance on hatcheries - have backfired.

Expand All

October 07, 2017 10:54 PM