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  • Eclipse 101: Straight from a Boise State professor to you

    Brian Jackson, a professor in Boise State's physics department talks about the total solar eclipse, the rare celestial event that will happen Aug. 21, 2017, casting the entire middle of Idaho, including the Treasure Valley, in deep shadow in the middle of a summer morning.

Brian Jackson, a professor in Boise State's physics department talks about the total solar eclipse, the rare celestial event that will happen Aug. 21, 2017, casting the entire middle of Idaho, including the Treasure Valley, in deep shadow in the middle of a summer morning. Darin Oswald, Anna Webb
Brian Jackson, a professor in Boise State's physics department talks about the total solar eclipse, the rare celestial event that will happen Aug. 21, 2017, casting the entire middle of Idaho, including the Treasure Valley, in deep shadow in the middle of a summer morning. Darin Oswald, Anna Webb

For some students, school starts the day of the August eclipse. That's a problem.

June 23, 2017 01:20 PM

UPDATED June 28, 2017 06:24 AM

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  • 'Payback' from athletics has lifted Boise State as a whole, Kustra says

    Sports is "an enormous investment" for Boise State University, but one that has paid off for the school as a whole, said BSU President Bob Kustra. "That Fiesta Bowl of 2007 really gave us a set of strategies on how we could take the rest of the university on the national stage that football took us in that year." Kustra plans to retire in June 2018. He spoke Nov. 17, 2017, two days after announcing those retirement plans.