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February 17, 2013 12:00 AM

Disaster preparation is a growing market for some Idaho businesses

Idaho has gained a reputation for being friendly to people who expect the worst and want to prepare for it. Maybe it's the rugged mountain-man image. Or its reputation for attracting anti-government survivalists. Or its love of the Second Amendment. But it's Idaho's practical qualities that some emergency-preparedness and survival businesses say they like.

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