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Firefighter catches child dropped from ladder 0:21

Firefighter catches child dropped from ladder

Boiseans are ready to make a statement at this year's Women's March 1:01

Boiseans are ready to make a statement at this year's Women's March

Defense Secretary James Mattis visits Mountain Home Air Force Base 1:42

Defense Secretary James Mattis visits Mountain Home Air Force Base

'It's like the fox and the hound': Idaho man's coyote play-wrestles a goat 0:34

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A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting 1:47

A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

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  • Boise looks to homeowners to fight fire, invasive species in the Foothills

    Some homeowners have been doing this already around property on what’s known as the wildland-urban interface — the boundary between developed and undeveloped land — even though it’s illegal. Brett Hutcheson was once one of them, now Boise Parks and Recreation has given seven homeowners permission to cut down grasses in city-owned open space reserves just outside their properties

Some homeowners have been doing this already around property on what’s known as the wildland-urban interface — the boundary between developed and undeveloped land — even though it’s illegal. Brett Hutcheson was once one of them, now Boise Parks and Recreation has given seven homeowners permission to cut down grasses in city-owned open space reserves just outside their properties Kyle Green kgreen@idahostatesman.com
Some homeowners have been doing this already around property on what’s known as the wildland-urban interface — the boundary between developed and undeveloped land — even though it’s illegal. Brett Hutcheson was once one of them, now Boise Parks and Recreation has given seven homeowners permission to cut down grasses in city-owned open space reserves just outside their properties Kyle Green kgreen@idahostatesman.com

Lightning-sparked fires burn 16,000 Valley acres; cause of fires near Firebird uncertain

June 27, 2017 07:33 AM

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Firefighter catches child dropped from ladder 0:21

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Boiseans are ready to make a statement at this year's Women's March 1:01

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Defense Secretary James Mattis visits Mountain Home Air Force Base 1:42

Defense Secretary James Mattis visits Mountain Home Air Force Base

'It's like the fox and the hound': Idaho man's coyote play-wrestles a goat 0:34

'It's like the fox and the hound': Idaho man's coyote play-wrestles a goat

Idaho man's 'pet' coyote, dog love to tussle, he says 0:25

Idaho man's 'pet' coyote, dog love to tussle, he says

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Trooper warns speeders of danger on Simco Road after two recent fatal crashes

A wolf near Boise? Foothills homeowners describe sighting 1:47

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'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

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  • Boiseans are ready to make a statement at this year's Women's March

    Last year's Women's March in Boise saw a historic crowd of roughly 6,000 people marching through Downtown. This year, they're once again armed with signs and slogans, hoping to draw another big crowd.