The National Debt Clock in Midtown Manhattan in February 2004. The debt has nearly tripled since then. The clock was put up as a political message in the 1980s. It was turned off in 2000 as the government ran surpluses and restarted in 2002.
The National Debt Clock in Midtown Manhattan in February 2004. The debt has nearly tripled since then. The clock was put up as a political message in the 1980s. It was turned off in 2000 as the government ran surpluses and restarted in 2002. Marilynn K. Yee The New York Times
The National Debt Clock in Midtown Manhattan in February 2004. The debt has nearly tripled since then. The clock was put up as a political message in the 1980s. It was turned off in 2000 as the government ran surpluses and restarted in 2002. Marilynn K. Yee The New York Times

Our national debt will reach $20 trillion soon. Let’s hope we can solve this problem.

July 12, 2017 7:45 PM