The National Debt Clock in Midtown Manhattan in February 2004. The debt has nearly tripled since then. The clock was put up as a political message in the 1980s. It was turned off in 2000 as the government ran surpluses and restarted in 2002.
The National Debt Clock in Midtown Manhattan in February 2004. The debt has nearly tripled since then. The clock was put up as a political message in the 1980s. It was turned off in 2000 as the government ran surpluses and restarted in 2002. Marilynn K. Yee The New York Times
The National Debt Clock in Midtown Manhattan in February 2004. The debt has nearly tripled since then. The clock was put up as a political message in the 1980s. It was turned off in 2000 as the government ran surpluses and restarted in 2002. Marilynn K. Yee The New York Times

Our national debt will reach $20 trillion soon. Let’s hope we can solve this problem.

July 12, 2017 07:45 PM

More Videos

  • Facing eviction? Deportation? Law students in Boise offer free legal help

    Concordia Law School’s library in Downtown Boise is now a place where people who are too poor to afford a lawyer, yet don’t qualify for government assistance can find help in a time of desperation. Listen as Latonia Haney Keith, associate professor and director of clinical education at Concordia describes the program.