Audra Kershner works at Girls Scouts of Silver Sage Council in Boise as a volunteer development manager — the same as coworker Megan Schuelke, right. Most employees at the office will change how they conduct their day with the new labor rule that requires employers to pay people overtime if their salary is less than about $47,500 a year. Kershner says the changes will be a good thing for her and others overall, but it will take some adjusting.
Audra Kershner works at Girls Scouts of Silver Sage Council in Boise as a volunteer development manager — the same as coworker Megan Schuelke, right. Most employees at the office will change how they conduct their day with the new labor rule that requires employers to pay people overtime if their salary is less than about $47,500 a year. Kershner says the changes will be a good thing for her and others overall, but it will take some adjusting. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com
Audra Kershner works at Girls Scouts of Silver Sage Council in Boise as a volunteer development manager — the same as coworker Megan Schuelke, right. Most employees at the office will change how they conduct their day with the new labor rule that requires employers to pay people overtime if their salary is less than about $47,500 a year. Kershner says the changes will be a good thing for her and others overall, but it will take some adjusting. Darin Oswald doswald@idahostatesman.com

Some Idaho employers face up to new overtime rule, others avoid it

September 20, 2016 06:41 PM