President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan wave to onlookers at the Capitol as they stand at the podium in Washington after the inauguration on Jan. 20, 1981. Some of President Donald Trump’s plans echo those of Reagan and could have similar economic effects, but there are key differences between the economies of then and now.
President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan wave to onlookers at the Capitol as they stand at the podium in Washington after the inauguration on Jan. 20, 1981. Some of President Donald Trump’s plans echo those of Reagan and could have similar economic effects, but there are key differences between the economies of then and now. AP
President Ronald Reagan and first lady Nancy Reagan wave to onlookers at the Capitol as they stand at the podium in Washington after the inauguration on Jan. 20, 1981. Some of President Donald Trump’s plans echo those of Reagan and could have similar economic effects, but there are key differences between the economies of then and now. AP

Rising interest rates, bigger federal deficits a deja vu of 1980s

February 03, 2017 03:23 PM

UPDATED February 03, 2017 11:03 PM

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