More Videos

Watch 5 years of JUMP construction in 1 time-lapse minute 1:13

Watch 5 years of JUMP construction in 1 time-lapse minute

Loans go sour in Canyon County housing venture 1:41

Loans go sour in Canyon County housing venture

Their Boise-built still was months late, they said - and then it exploded 0:36

Their Boise-built still was months late, they said - and then it exploded

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare 0:55

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare

Making high-end distilling equipment in Boise 2:41

Making high-end distilling equipment in Boise

Her dad went to Korea when she was 2. She's 69 and he is still missing. 2:12

Her dad went to Korea when she was 2. She's 69 and he is still missing.

Revealing the 2016 All-Idaho Football Players of the Year — 5A-1A 1:37

Revealing the 2016 All-Idaho Football Players of the Year — 5A-1A

Bryan Harsin gets soaked, Broncos celebrate 0:58

Bryan Harsin gets soaked, Broncos celebrate

Boise State coach Bryan Harsin meets the media in Las Vegas 6:36

Boise State coach Bryan Harsin meets the media in Las Vegas

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

  • What gave Idahoans with disabilities the right to choose where they live?

    In the Olmstead case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that people with disabilities have the right to live in their communities instead of in institutions. This excerpted video, produced by the U.S. departments of justice and health and human services, shows people who have benefited from Olmstead as well as disability rights advocates, including Sue Jamieson, the lead attorney in the case.

In the Olmstead case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that people with disabilities have the right to live in their communities instead of in institutions. This excerpted video, produced by the U.S. departments of justice and health and human services, shows people who have benefited from Olmstead as well as disability rights advocates, including Sue Jamieson, the lead attorney in the case. U.S. Department of Justice/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
In the Olmstead case, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that people with disabilities have the right to live in their communities instead of in institutions. This excerpted video, produced by the U.S. departments of justice and health and human services, shows people who have benefited from Olmstead as well as disability rights advocates, including Sue Jamieson, the lead attorney in the case. U.S. Department of Justice/U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

'I don't care ... whose fault it is': Just let disabled Idahoans live on their own

January 05, 2017 11:12 PM

UPDATED January 13, 2017 11:31 AM

More Videos

Watch 5 years of JUMP construction in 1 time-lapse minute 1:13

Watch 5 years of JUMP construction in 1 time-lapse minute

Loans go sour in Canyon County housing venture 1:41

Loans go sour in Canyon County housing venture

Their Boise-built still was months late, they said - and then it exploded 0:36

Their Boise-built still was months late, they said - and then it exploded

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare 0:55

5 steps to staying covered under Obamacare

Making high-end distilling equipment in Boise 2:41

Making high-end distilling equipment in Boise

Her dad went to Korea when she was 2. She's 69 and he is still missing. 2:12

Her dad went to Korea when she was 2. She's 69 and he is still missing.

Revealing the 2016 All-Idaho Football Players of the Year — 5A-1A 1:37

Revealing the 2016 All-Idaho Football Players of the Year — 5A-1A

Bryan Harsin gets soaked, Broncos celebrate 0:58

Bryan Harsin gets soaked, Broncos celebrate

Boise State coach Bryan Harsin meets the media in Las Vegas 6:36

Boise State coach Bryan Harsin meets the media in Las Vegas

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim 2:33

'No workplace is immune' to harassment, says former state worker behind tort claim

  • Loans go sour in Canyon County housing venture

    Roger Button explains how he lost $650,000 loaned to construct homes in Canyon County.