News

March 5, 2013 4:45 PM

Mexican families struggle to bring attention to those who’ve disappeared

Rogelio Elizondo’s son went to buy a used car in Nuevo Laredo two years ago. He never came back. In much of Mexico, Elizondo’s tragedy would remain the anguish of a solitary family in a country where the problem of ‘disappeared’ people is worse than anyplace else in the Western Hemisphere. But a slightly more positive story is unfolding. Elizondo joined with scores of other families looking into the cases of 298 missing persons in his state of Coahuila. The families raised a clamor. They met with the governor, who agreed to set up a special prosecutor’s office for the disappeared. And the fears of relatives melted somewhat as their ranks grew.

Related content

Comments

Videos

More Videos

Playing at Borah Pool splashpad in Boise 00:32

Playing at Borah Pool splashpad in Boise

May 17 Boise Bench fire 01:12

May 17 Boise Bench fire

Forty-eight Idaho residents become U.S. citizens 00:52

Forty-eight Idaho residents become U.S. citizens

The View From Terra Nativa 00:24

The View From Terra Nativa

How Many Zookeepers Does It Take To Lift An Aldabra Tortoise? 00:42

How Many Zookeepers Does It Take To Lift An Aldabra Tortoise?

Boise Airport trains for disaster with mock airplane crash 01:15

Boise Airport trains for disaster with mock airplane crash

Angie Smith photographs Boise's refugees 01:39

Angie Smith photographs Boise's refugees

Boise homeless leave Cooper Court tent city 03:45

Boise homeless leave Cooper Court tent city

Naghmeh Abedini gives her thoughts after meeting Obama 00:34

Naghmeh Abedini gives her thoughts after meeting Obama

Share Video

Editor's Choice Videos