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  • Armenian genocide was 101 years ago, but it's still personal for Boise daughter of a survivor

    The Armenian Genocide is often called “the forgotten genocide,” yet 1.5 million Armenians were killed between 1915 and 1923. Jo-Ann Kachigian remembers her mother and father, who witnessed it all — and survived. She thinks of her grandparents, her aunts and uncles and cousins, 46 of them in all — who didn’t. Jo-Ann vows to tell her mother's story and teach others about the genocide, “with the hope that remembering our tragic past will keep us from repeating it.”

The Armenian Genocide is often called “the forgotten genocide,” yet 1.5 million Armenians were killed between 1915 and 1923. Jo-Ann Kachigian remembers her mother and father, who witnessed it all — and survived. She thinks of her grandparents, her aunts and uncles and cousins, 46 of them in all — who didn’t. Jo-Ann vows to tell her mother's story and teach others about the genocide, “with the hope that remembering our tragic past will keep us from repeating it.” Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com
The Armenian Genocide is often called “the forgotten genocide,” yet 1.5 million Armenians were killed between 1915 and 1923. Jo-Ann Kachigian remembers her mother and father, who witnessed it all — and survived. She thinks of her grandparents, her aunts and uncles and cousins, 46 of them in all — who didn’t. Jo-Ann vows to tell her mother's story and teach others about the genocide, “with the hope that remembering our tragic past will keep us from repeating it.” Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com

Boisean vows to tell the story of her mother, a survivor of the Armenian Genocide

April 15, 2016 6:58 PM