Laurie Enger came close to death after a pesticide was misapplied at her home 15 years ago. “It was a terrible, terrible thing and I’m not overstating the fact to say it was a tortuous, hellish situation for years,” she says. Her health is still compromised and, she says, she lost most of her middle age to the poisoning. But she’s the kind of woman who works hard to see the blessings in difficult times. “There are ways that for my own spiritual maturity, for lack of a better term, that I am grateful for this experience, even though there were great losses,” she says. “I hope that doesn’t sound Pollyana like; it just opened deep insights for me that I’m not sure I would have gotten if I hadn’t had to struggle so hard.”
Laurie Enger came close to death after a pesticide was misapplied at her home 15 years ago. “It was a terrible, terrible thing and I’m not overstating the fact to say it was a tortuous, hellish situation for years,” she says. Her health is still compromised and, she says, she lost most of her middle age to the poisoning. But she’s the kind of woman who works hard to see the blessings in difficult times. “There are ways that for my own spiritual maturity, for lack of a better term, that I am grateful for this experience, even though there were great losses,” she says. “I hope that doesn’t sound Pollyana like; it just opened deep insights for me that I’m not sure I would have gotten if I hadn’t had to struggle so hard.” Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com
Laurie Enger came close to death after a pesticide was misapplied at her home 15 years ago. “It was a terrible, terrible thing and I’m not overstating the fact to say it was a tortuous, hellish situation for years,” she says. Her health is still compromised and, she says, she lost most of her middle age to the poisoning. But she’s the kind of woman who works hard to see the blessings in difficult times. “There are ways that for my own spiritual maturity, for lack of a better term, that I am grateful for this experience, even though there were great losses,” she says. “I hope that doesn’t sound Pollyana like; it just opened deep insights for me that I’m not sure I would have gotten if I hadn’t had to struggle so hard.” Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com

Joy that comes from surviving darkest of times

November 14, 2015 9:51 PM

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