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  • California condor in Boise has a cool role in the history of wild condors

    One of the California condors you can see on display at the World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise, started life as an egg laid by the last two wild condors in the world, before his parents were captured to become part of a captive breeding program to save the species. He's played a role in the growth of the condor population, and he's got a new one soon. His name is Nojoqui, pronounced "Nahoy."

California condor in Boise has a cool role in the history of wild condors

One of the California condors you can see on display at the World Center for Birds of Prey south of Boise, started life as an egg laid by the last two wild condors in the world, before his parents were captured to become part of a captive breeding program to save the species. He's played a role in the growth of the condor population, and he's got a new one soon. His name is Nojoqui, pronounced "Nahoy."
Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com