Cheri Jorgenson is a volunteer at International Rescue Committee, where she teaches a weekly job class. It is important to learn about other people who are different from ourselves, she says. “To learn about ‘the other,’ we will learn about ourselves. And they will also learn about us — if we have the courage to step outside our comfort zone — if we make that first step to learn about others.” Because of that, Cheri also volunteers twice a year, at her own expense, at a camp for Syrian refugee children living along the border. “I don’t get paid. I do it because I can,” she says. “Because I can, I have a responsibility to do this.”
Cheri Jorgenson is a volunteer at International Rescue Committee, where she teaches a weekly job class. It is important to learn about other people who are different from ourselves, she says. “To learn about ‘the other,’ we will learn about ourselves. And they will also learn about us — if we have the courage to step outside our comfort zone — if we make that first step to learn about others.” Because of that, Cheri also volunteers twice a year, at her own expense, at a camp for Syrian refugee children living along the border. “I don’t get paid. I do it because I can,” she says. “Because I can, I have a responsibility to do this.” Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com
Cheri Jorgenson is a volunteer at International Rescue Committee, where she teaches a weekly job class. It is important to learn about other people who are different from ourselves, she says. “To learn about ‘the other,’ we will learn about ourselves. And they will also learn about us — if we have the courage to step outside our comfort zone — if we make that first step to learn about others.” Because of that, Cheri also volunteers twice a year, at her own expense, at a camp for Syrian refugee children living along the border. “I don’t get paid. I do it because I can,” she says. “Because I can, I have a responsibility to do this.” Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com

Boisean teaches refugees, here and abroad, the language of hope

February 03, 2017 08:01 PM

UPDATED February 10, 2017 06:39 PM

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