Heart of Treasure Valley

Heart of Treasure Valley

Nampa native helps kids around the world with shoes that grow

Little things that make a big difference is his philosophy, and after seeing children in Africa going barefoot and getting sick, and wearing shoes far too small, Nampa native Kenton Lee and a bunch of his friends invented a shoe that can grow five sizes and last five years. “My goal became: What can I do from here that could still have an impact on kids around the world?”

Heart of Treasure Valley

Boise woman dedicated to dispelling myths on Muslims, refugees

Asmaa Albukaie, 33, and her two sons were the first Syrian refugees in Idaho 18 months ago. She feels there’s a reason they were the first: They have a lot of educating to do. “People, when they know (that I am) from Syria, they are surprised,” says Asmaa. “I ask them why you are surprised? They told me they had an idea of Syrian lady and they were afraid.” Instead, Asmaa radiates. “If you love, there is no room for hate in my heart,” she says. “This I believe.”

Heart of Treasure Valley

Nampa Century Club awards two scholarships

The oldest civic club in Nampa recently announced that it is awarding two $1,000 scholarships to local students. Formed in 1900 with the goal of starting a public library, the Woman’s Century Club obtained a grant for the construction of a Carnegie Library, and E.H. Dewey donated a lot on 2nd Street South.

Heart of Treasure Valley

Armenian genocide was 101 years ago, but it's still personal for Boise daughter of a survivor

The Armenian Genocide is often called “the forgotten genocide,” yet 1.5 million Armenians were killed between 1915 and 1923. Jo-Ann Kachigian remembers her mother and father, who witnessed it all — and survived. She thinks of her grandparents, her aunts and uncles and cousins, 46 of them in all — who didn’t. Jo-Ann vows to tell her mother's story and teach others about the genocide, “with the hope that remembering our tragic past will keep us from repeating it.”

Heart of Treasure Valley

Boise Christians, Muslims build bridges of understanding

After 23 years of living and working in a predominantly Muslim country, Nick and Laura Armstrong returned to Boise and were startled by Americans’ animosity toward Muslims because it was so contradictory to their experience in Indonesia. They started Peace Feasts as a way of building bridges between Christians and Muslims — time to ask questions, share their deep faiths and listen intently — over a shared meal.

Heart of Treasure Valley

Boise Muslims and Christians share dinner and their faiths

After 23 years of living and working in a predominantly Muslim country, Nick and Laura Armstrong returned to Boise — and were startled by Americans’ animosity toward Muslims because it was so contradictory to their experience in Indonesia. They started Peace Feasts as a way of building bridges between Christians and Muslims — finding commonalities, asking questions, sharing their deep faiths and listening intently — over a shared meal.

Heart of Treasure Valley

Wounded veteran trains twice to climb Everest

Since having his lower leg amputated after stepping on a bomb in Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Charlie Linville has tried twice to climb the highest mountain in the world — and each time was turned away by devastating natural disasters on and near Everest. He wanted — and wants — to prove something to himself, to other veterans and to the world: That injured veterans can do anything. His climb is sponsored by The Heroes Project.

About Heart of the Treasure Valley

Katherine Jones

Know someone living “from the heart?” Idaho Statesman photojournalist Katherine Jones spotlights someone in the Treasure Valley who influences our lives not only by what they do, but how and why they do it. Do you know someone we should know? Call 377-6414 or email kjones@idahostatesman.com.

Videos

Nampa native helps kids around the world with shoes that grow

Little things that make a big difference is his philosophy, and after seeing children in Africa going barefoot and getting sick, and wearing shoes far too small, Nampa native Kenton Lee and a bunch of his friends invented a shoe that can grow five sizes and last five years. “My goal became: What can I do from here that could still have an impact on kids around the world?”
Katherine Jones kjones@idahostatesman.com
Nampa native helps kids around the world with shoes that grow 2:53

Nampa native helps kids around the world with shoes that grow

Volunteers are the heart and soul of Weiser Fiddle Contest 1:44

Volunteers are the heart and soul of Weiser Fiddle Contest

Onward Shay! A Boise marathon and memorial for Shay Hirsch 2:27

Onward Shay! A Boise marathon and memorial for Shay Hirsch

How to survive living with a basset hound: Walt and Buster 2:43

How to survive living with a basset hound: Walt and Buster