Margaret Lauterbach

Margaret Lauterbach

Plant plants that are nontoxic to wildlife

Gardening and farming are both a matter of co-existing with wildlife, from microscopic life in the soil to the large hooved animals in our area. Those of us who revere IPM (Integrated Pest Management) don’t bother to control destructive insects until the damage becomes too severe to tolerate. Some of us use beneficial insects to control the bad guys. The longer one gardens, the more one appreciates nature.

Margaret Lauterbach

For the novice gardener, here’s primer

Statesman gardening columnist Margaret Lauterbach is taking some time off. She’ll be writing again in January. But she’s checking her email, so if you have questions, email her at melauter@earthlink.net. Meantime, we’re repeating some of her most popular advice.

Margaret Lauterbach

Like onions? Here’s a primer for growing

Statesman gardening columnist Margaret Lauterbach is taking some time off. She’ll be writing again in January. But she’s checking her email, so if you have questions, email her at melauter@earthlink.net. Meantime, we’re repeating some of her most popular advice.

Margaret Lauterbach

Edible amaranths provide resilient, nutritious plants

Have you grown amaranth on purpose? Many folks grow some Amaranths for ornament, since most are attractive plants. One of the most popular varieties is “Love Lies Bleeding,” or Amaranthus cruentus. Some folks grow elephant head amaranth, A. gangeticus, that definitely grows as an annual. Some amaranths grow as annuals, others as short-lived perennials. It is native to the Americas, so it’s not surprising there are also weedy amaranths that grow here, that we call pigweed.

About Margaret Lauterbach

Margaret Lauterbach

The Statesman's weekly gardening columnist, Margaret Lauterbach has advised Treasure Valley gardeners on everything from sowing to composting to coping with the soils, pests and diseases of this unique climate. Send garden questions to melauter@earthlink.net or Gardening, The Statesman, P.O. Box 40, Boise, ID 83707.

Videos

Watch Idaho Fish and Game move an elk from a city park to the hills

A bull elk took up residence in Weiser Memorial Park. City officials decided it was time for him to go on Friday, Feb. 24 -- and it took many of Idaho Fish and Game's tricks to evict him.
Chadd Cripe ccripe@idahostatesman.com
Watch Idaho Fish and Game move an elk from a city park to the hills 5:02

Watch Idaho Fish and Game move an elk from a city park to the hills

With district title in hand, Rocky Mountain boys basketball turns focus to state 1:11

With district title in hand, Rocky Mountain boys basketball turns focus to state

Leon Rice: 4:32

Leon Rice: "We gave them the standard 24 hours to mourn"

Idaho wineries gets schooled on best pracrices for tasting rooms 2:28

Idaho wineries gets schooled on best pracrices for tasting rooms