Everest climb called off; Boise veteran returning home

newsroom@idahostatesman.comApril 25, 2014 

Charlie in Ecuador.JPG

Charlie Linville of Boise reached the summit of Mt. Aconcagua in February and will attempt Everest in the spring.

PROVIDED BY THE HEROES PROJECT

USMC Staff Sgt. Charlie Linville, a Boise veteran climbing Mount Everest with a film crew as part of a motivational project for injured veterans, will be returning home.

One week after the avalanche that claimed the lives of 16 Sherpa guides on Mount Everest, The Heroes Project Founder Tim Medvetz announced they are suspending operations.

“We have decided to come home and are no longer pursuing Operation Everest: 2014, honoring our Sherpas’ decision to not climb this year, and out of respect for those who were lost last week. We have spent the last week focused on the recovery effort and mourning those who were lost and discussing all aspects as a team,” said Medvetz in a press release on Friday.

“The bond and personal relationships I have with these men goes back over ten years, they are my family. They are members of our team and out of respect to our Sherpas, we are not continuing. We fully support their decision to leave the mountain and we will leave the mountain together the same way we came up, as a team,” he continued.

The Heroes Project is making a documentary about injured veterans climbing the tallest peaks on seven continents.

Linville, 28, lost his right foot, several fingers and suffered an injured back while diffusing a bomb in Afghanistan in 2011.

The six-member team began its journey to climb Mount Everest on March 27 and arrived at its base camp on April 16. They were not at Everest Base Camp when the April 18 avalanche struck.

Project spokesman Zach Rosenfield said the crew plans to resume the climb with Linville in the spring of 2015.

Since its inception in 2009, the foundation has taken wounded veterans on over a dozen climbs, including six of the world’s seven highest summits. This was the foundation's first attempt at Mount Everest.

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