Hax: Be patient with boyfriend's parents

The Washington PostMarch 14, 2014 

Dear Carolyn: My boyfriend's parents are against our relationship. My boyfriend (31) and I (26) have been on and off for three years, but have remained best friends since we met. He is from England, and they have a real problem with the idea of him settling in the Midwest.

A while back, I wrote a letter to his mother, mostly to break the ice, but she didn't even respond.

We are moving in together in a couple of weeks and plan to marry sometime soon after. I want to start a family with this man. We are head-over-heels in love and have been fighting it for some time now because of them. Seriously, this is the kind of love Disney makes a movie about. I can't walk away (we've tried), but it's very difficult for me to imagine my children's grandparents hating me. What do we do?

A.

First on your to-do list: Understand. Appreciate their position. Disney's rough on mothers.

Imagine your someday child, imagine spending 31 years with vaguely pleasant hopes of a close relationship with that child and his family as an adult, imagine imagining what it will be like to hold your grandchild and watch him or her grow up.

Now imagine putting all of that an eight-plus-hour, $1,000-plus flight away. It is not unreasonable for your boyfriend's parents to grieve their son's decision to put down roots overseas.

It's his life, though, obviously, and of course they have the option of accepting this development with all the good sportsmanship they can muster. Apparently they've declined this option and that's unfortunate.

Be patient. You may have been in this relationship for years, but the off-and-on nature of it allowed his parents to tell themselves it might not last. Now that you're moving in and planning to marry, that starts the clock on their absolutely having to deal with it. Give them a chance to.

Their relationship is for them to work out, but you can help that cause by making a long-term commitment to patience and understanding. And travel: Be the woman who encourages their son to stay close to them, versus the woman who took him away.

Email tellme@washpost.com. Chat online at 10 a.m. Fridays at www.washingtonpost.com.

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