5 things to do in Idaho with that extra hour each evening

March 10, 2014 

greenbelt.JPG

Cyclists love the smooth pathway through the new Marianne Williams Park in Boise. It’s an alternate route to the bumpy Greenbelt path along Warm Springs Avenue from Warm Springs Mesa to Eckert Road.

PETE ZIMOWSKY — pzimowsky@idahostatesman.com

1. Go for a ride. If you've been off your bike for months, it's time to get going. Go for a spin and take it easy at first. Don't try to tackle those big hills right from the start. Get some miles of easy pedaling so you won't be brutally sore the next day. Or if you're a bit of a masochist, just pick up right where you left off last year and suffer a bit. It's not the smartest thing to do, but what the heck? It probably won't kill you, just make you walk funny the next day.

2. Fish a pond. They're being stocked with trout, and a little more sunny weather will make the warm-water fish wake up. Grab a fishing rod and take a kid along. If they're youngsters, fish near a park, like Merrill Park in Eagle or McDevitt Park off Eagle Road in Meridian. That way, if the kids get restless, they can burn off some energy at the playground.

3. Walk your dog. Don't make it about you, make it about the dog. Take them to a dog park or someplace where they can run. Nothing warms the heart like seeing a dog with its ears laid back and sprinting full speed for no particular reason, then spinning and sprinting back like the breeze is guiding it. It's the spirit of spring embodied.

4. Go for a run. Lace up the sneakers and take a slow, steady jog. It will clear the head, lungs and get those endorphins surging through your body. You will walk away tired and refreshed at the same time.

5. Paddle around. Grab your kayak, canoe, row boat or anything else and get back on the water. You will love the feel of water beneath you as you cruise along. Rowing or paddling a boat is like stealth exercise. It's so relaxing and meditative to pull a boat through the water that you'll forget you're working out.

Idaho Statesman is pleased to provide this opportunity to share information, experiences and observations about what's in the news. Some of the comments may be reprinted elsewhere in the site or in the newspaper. We encourage lively, open debate on the issues of the day, and ask that you refrain from profanity, hate speech, personal comments and remarks that are off point. Thank you for taking the time to offer your thoughts.

Commenting FAQs | Terms of Service