Hax: Family obsessed with losing weight

The Washington PostDecember 11, 2013 

Dear Carolyn: Each and every member of my family views thinness as the absolute key measure of success in life. Some are bulimic, some anorexic, but all have eating disorders.

I'm in my mid-50s, athletic, and of average weight according to medical guidelines. My weight has fluctuated about 15 pounds through the years. I visit as frequently as I can from a several-state distance.

The first thing, and I stress, the VERY first thing, said to me upon arrival is: "You look like you've lost weight." Or, if I'm up 15, nothing is said but diet tips will be given throughout the visit.

My parents are elderly, and it's too late to change that pattern now. My sister, though, is an unwanted, talking scale. Many years ago, while I was getting rid of post-baby fat, she grabbed my niece and my daughter and went into a circle dance, chanting, "We're the skinnies! We're the skinnies!" 'Round and around they went. I hated her for it, and I hated me for being "fat."

I never want to hear a word from her again on the topic. What to say to stop it?

FAMILY OBSESSED WITH WEIGHT

My (imagined) hat's off to you for still visiting often. My car might have forgotten how to get there after years of cruel, humanity-negating myopia like this.

Assuming you keep up the visits, I offer three words: "I don't recall."

"I don't recall asking your opinion of my weight."

"I don't recall asking for help with my diet."

"I don't recall seeking your approval."

"I don't recall ever judging your worth based on your appearance."

Each and every time, speak with minimal emotion, and follow each and every time by disengaging - changing the subject, leaving the room, getting up to "stretch my legs," maybe with a two-handed slap to the belly - or a decision to stay gone for good.

I actually pity your sister and parents for how many of their life chips they've put on this meaningless square. With resolve and some practice, you too can react to their comments more with pity than outrage. I expect that will help.

Email tellme@washpost.com. Chat online at 10 a.m. Fridays at www.washingtonpost.com.

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