Letters to the editor: 11-07-2013

November 7, 2013 

Education spending

I read Mr. Wolf’s letter to the Idaho Statesman complaining about David Adler’s focus on Idaho’s low rank (48th or thereabouts) on spending for education.

Apparently, Gov. Otter and his co-workers aiming to improve education in Idaho through a coalition with the legislative branch and the private sector believe directing additional funds toward education will provide a basis for raising the quality of an emerging workforce and raise the quality of life for all Idahoans, and make it a more attractive place for business and citizens alike.

Being 48th out of 50 suggests there is room for improvement, and I believe it is in our best interests for all of us to support David Adler, the Idaho Statesman and the governor’s efforts to address this vital issue.

DAVID EDERER, Meridian

Obama’s policies

Response for Michael Miller, Eagle:

Your question … “Why do liberals like Obama’s policies?” Let’s see … equal pay for women; ending two wars; applying new fiscal safeguards to reduce the likelihood of a repeat Wall Street crash (Dodd/Frank); overseeing the end of the Bush recession and ushering in nearly 20 straight quarters of GDP growth; elimination of gender discrimination policies in our military (DADT) and national government (DOMA); reduction of unwanted pregnancies and severe health maladies through no-cost health care prevention legislation; encouraging all Americans to participate in a, now, uniform health care industry; reducing the size of government and deficit through growth instead of austerity measures; and the ability to overcome the irresponsible intransigence within Congress and pay our ‘legal obligations’ on time.

Your final question … “Where have these policies worked?” According to Forbes , the L.I. International Prosperity Index ranks the U.S. as number 12 this year, so I would have you look at the top 11, who had implemented similar policies years before.

One can respect and appreciate our system of government and work within it to make it better … or … nitpick in the doldrums of obstructionism, your choice.

AL BAUN, Boise

Bush/Obama

As an Independent voter, I can choose to see things as they are, not as others want us to see them. The misdeeds of Obama’s predecessors prove that Obama is being racially discriminated against. He is baffled by his many predecessors who confined their interests to capitalism, but Obama desires for all people to have access to health insurance. His past occupiers of the White Hose ignored President Eisenhower’s admonition to be wary of establishing our government as the military/industrial complex.

President W. Bush acquired “kingship” as his family’s legacy. I consider him to have been overindulged, pampered and irresponsible as a result. He demonstrated himself to be a warmonger who stockpiled weapons/arms of massive destruction. He was a business person who knew nothing about diplomacy nor had an appreciation of cultural differences.

While health care is a massive problem, he has provided much business for that industry with the massive number of war injuries that it needs to cope with. Isn’t it possible that the people who would assign Obama with their perceived problems are in need of mental health care?

CECELIA B. LANGLAND, Boise

Term limits

I am amazed when I see pundits, columnists and political leaders express dismay about the gridlock in Washington. What to do? What to do?

The answer is so obvious — term limits. No one in Washington should ever be running for re-election! Imagine how that would change things.

Quid pro quos would dramatically change. Influence peddlers would depend upon novice candidates following through after election rather than incumbents granting prior favors for promises of re-election campaign donations to follow.

Increased staggered terms for Congress and the President would put K Street out of business and force incumbents to tend to business, rather than their political futures.

Oh yes, I have heard all of the arguments in the past about the loss of institutional memory, but maybe we would all be better off if we could lose memory of the current institution.

WILLIAM GOODNIGHT, Boise

Health care

Working in a hospital setting for the past 25 years as a physiotherapist I can attest to the lack of adequate health care services that many of our working poor citizens experience.

In contrast to the destitute, well-employed or the wealthy who are covered by public or private health insurance, the working poor and their families currently must either pay out of pocket or slide into a level of poverty that qualifies them for Medicaid ($13,000 per year for a family of four).

Now my question is, to those who would deny these hard-working citizens the relief contained in the ACA for this class of patient simply because they are suspicious of Obama, what do you suggest we do with them when they or their families become ill or injured?

In a just society access to medical care is not seen as simply a privilege of the few who can afford it but as a basic human right. In my view, refusing a class of citizens that right because the system that is set up to provide that service is not yet perfect is at best, an excuse to maintain the inadequate and at worst, barbaric.

KENT TAUCER, Ontario

Dog shooting

I wonder how many utility workers, postal workers and delivery people have shot dogs while going about their daily work assignments. I have not seen any news articles reporting such incidents. Oh that’s right, they don’t carry guns!

AL BIRT, Nampa

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