Hax: Teach nephew a few table manners

The Washington PostAugust 6, 2013 

Adapted from a recent online discussion.

Dear Carolyn: My 13-year-old nephew eats with his hands, spills food all over the place, chews with his mouth open, etc. My brother is a single father and has just never taught him proper table manners.

Both my brother and nephew act offended if I say anything.

He's a sweet, intelligent young man, but I really worry that this will hold him back in life. Who wants to go on a dinner date or to a business lunch with someone who spills food all over himself? Is there anything I can say or do to help my nephew here?

MINDING MANNERS

The defensiveness will hold him back more than his manners do.

If you're in the position to do this, emotionally and geographically, then start taking him out to lunches or dinners one-on-one. Tell your brother you're doing it because he's getting older and you want to get to know him as the adult he's becoming.

Great cause, right?

Then, at strategic times during these meals, take on the table manners - maybe not on the first or even second one, but when it's an established thing and you have a rapport going. Don't be coy; that's often more insulting than being direct: "OK, we need to teach you to use a fork."

If he looks hurt, then assure him it's not personal, and that most kids need a lesson or two in not showing their chewed food to people three tables away. As needed, point out that taking all constructive criticism as an attack may close him off to learning from others - and no one on earth has everything all figured out.

Again, this applies IF you are close enough to do so. If you aren't, then you need to accept that not everyone can fix everything about everyone. Manners are serious when you lose a prospective job or relationship over them, yes, but they're not serious in an immediate or life-threatening kind of way. That means this is a problem you can turn over to the Village, since there are bound to be villagers in his future with better standing to help him out.

Email tellme@washpost.com. Chat online at 10 a.m. Fridays at www.washingtonpost.com.

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